TEoD: Chapter 6: Introducing Caiaphas

Looks like the flashback to Bible times this book will be a look back at Caiaphas, and the trial of Jesus.

I’ll admit, I’m not as up on Caiaphas as I am on some other Bible characters and stories.  Still, I look forward to learning more.  Especially as the whole thing seems like a delightful entry into the old the-Jews-killed-Jesus trope, and given the fact that Murphy’s best buddy is Jewish, this might be amusing.

So Caiaphas hires “two swarthy men.” (Of course they’re swarthy.  Apparently they also stink and have bad breath.  Because all bad guys do.)  The swarthy guys are to spy on Jesus and report back to Caiaphas.

Bizarrely, the two stinky guys manage to follow Jesus and the disciples out of Jerusalem and all the way up the Mount of Olives (a 30-minute climb, we are helpfully informed) without being detected.  It’s important that Jesus took the guys all the way up there…because he needs to tell them about things they will never see or experience!

“Can we tell when the end of the world will come?” asked Peter.

“Others will come in my name, claiming to be the Messiah.  They will lead many astray.  Wars will break out near and far, but don’t panic.”

Yeah, don’t panic, Peter—BECAUSE YOU WON’T BE ALIVE TO SEE IT.

Seriously, Jesus goes on and on and ON about all this (“It sounds as if it will be a terrible time of tribulation,” Peter helpfully exposits) but never once points out to the apostles that all this will happen in a series of books published in the 1990s and 2000s.

Seriously, none of the apostles will see this, according to LaHaye.  And Jesus knows that they won’t see it.  So why waste their precious time together (and Jesus knows just how precious and short this time is) by informing them of this but not that it will happen far, far in the future?

Just seems cruel, is all I’m saying.

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Posted on April 29, 2017, in The Edge of Darkness. Bookmark the permalink. 10 Comments.

  1. InquisitiveRaven

    Not to mention that if these prophecies are at all like the ones in the bible, they’re so generic as to be utterly meaningless, like the one about wars.

  2. Well, *obviously* he’s not going to tell them…if the kids know Daddy will be gone a long time, they’ll get up to mischief. Much better to have them worried he might pop back in and yell at them at any moment!

  3. We’re in the fourth book in this series and I’ve just now realized that I still don’t see the point of these “flashback to Bible times” chapters. They don’t advance the plot of Murphy following Meth’s clues and finding strange religious artifacts, and the events in these chapters often have little to nothing to do with whatever Murphy’s doing anyway. It just seems completely unnecessary to me that the entire plot with Murphy stops so we can have random chapters about Jesus or some other Bible character doing stuff.

    • “It just seems completely unnecessary to me that the entire plot with Murphy stops so we can have random chapters about Jesus or some other Bible character doing stuff.”
      And – in this chapter at least – doing and saying stuff that aren’t in any versions of the Bible. So the authors aren’t even using these interludes as Bible teaching.
      Like Meth’s pointless games with Murphy, it’s just another way of padding out the wordcount.

    • The point is to show that all those ancient and very real Biblical figures agree with LaHaye.

      • Yes, this. LaHaye is at least vaguely aware that people make weird suggestions like “you know, I’m pretty sure that’s a description of the Roman Emperor at the time it was said, not a young Robert Redford in the 21st century” and “why waste their precious time together (and Jesus knows just how precious and short this time is) by informing them of this but not that it will happen far, far in the future?” which hinge on the obviously ridiculous idea that people who aren’t just like him, some of whom lived long before he was born, are people rather than minor background details in a story which is about him. His solution is the same as it is for any instance of people denying an aspect of his beliefs: co-write a series of novels in which he’s unambiguously right, and point to those novels as proof of his rightness.

  4. I think we’d have to go back to the first book, by Dinallo, to figure out the point of those sequences. Phillips might have no deeper reason than “because the first book had them”.

  5. There’s just no way I can think of anyone but the gravelly voiced guy from Jesus Christ Superstar.

  6. It really seems like LaHaye was under the impression that Judaism and Christianity were solely about the End Times. The statue of Nebuchadnezzar, a reference to Adam prophesying an end by fire in the second book, now this…I’d be more interested in IF there’s an end times–and if so, how to interdict it. (Or maybe LaHaye thought that EVERYONE wanted this world to pass away to make room for Paradise…)

  1. Pingback: Deconstruction Roundup for May 5th, 2017 | The Slacktiverse

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